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secrets

Manage deployment of secrets from a patterned directory

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Version information

  • 1.2.4 (latest)
  • 1.2.3
  • 1.2.2
  • 1.2.1
  • 1.2.0
  • 1.1.1
  • 1.1.0
  • 1.0.4
  • 1.0.3
  • 1.0.2
  • 1.0.1
  • 1.0.0
  • 0.3.1
  • 0.3.0
  • 0.2.2
  • 0.2.1
  • 0.2.0
  • 0.1.5
  • 0.1.4
  • 0.1.3
  • 0.1.2 (deleted)
  • 0.1.1 (deleted)
  • 0.1.0 (deleted)
released Sep 1st 2023
This version is compatible with:
  • Puppet Enterprise 2023.7.x, 2023.6.x, 2023.5.x, 2023.4.x, 2023.3.x, 2023.2.x, 2023.1.x, 2023.0.x, 2021.7.x, 2021.6.x, 2021.5.x, 2021.4.x, 2021.3.x, 2021.2.x, 2021.1.x, 2021.0.x, 2019.8.x, 2019.7.x, 2019.5.x, 2019.4.x, 2019.3.x, 2019.2.x, 2019.1.x, 2019.0.x
  • Puppet >= 6.0.0 < 9.0.0
  • CentOS, OracleLinux, RedHat, Scientific, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, SLES, Gentoo

Start using this module

  • r10k or Code Manager
  • Bolt
  • Manual installation
  • Direct download

Add this module to your Puppetfile:

mod 'jcpunk-secrets', '1.2.4'
Learn more about managing modules with a Puppetfile

Add this module to your Bolt project:

bolt module add jcpunk-secrets
Learn more about using this module with an existing project

Manually install this module globally with Puppet module tool:

puppet module install jcpunk-secrets --version 1.2.4

Direct download is not typically how you would use a Puppet module to manage your infrastructure, but you may want to download the module in order to inspect the code.

Download
Tags: secrets

Documentation

jcpunk/secrets — version 1.2.4 Sep 1st 2023

secrets

Table of Contents

  1. Description
  2. Setup - The basics of getting started with secrets
  3. Usage - Configuration options and additional functionality
  4. Limitations - OS compatibility, etc.

Description

This class will deploy 'secrets' from outside the puppet tree onto your nodes.

It is targeted specifically at items like SSL certificates, ssh host keys, and kerberos keytabs. These are items that often have heavily restricted access.

These are items that you might not be able to store with your manifests.

Setup

Setup Requirements

Ultimately this module simply looks for ${secret_store}/$trusted['hostname'].$trusted['domain']/<path> on your puppet server and pushes it out to the the node.

You can setup an encrypted git repo to store things.

If your secrets are in a repo, you can use the puppetlabs-vcsrepo type to check them out.

Beginning with secrets

For the most basic configuration you can create a secret store with the following commands:

mkdir -p /etc/puppetlabs/secrets
mkdir -p /etc/puppetlabs/secrets/myhostname.example.com/etc/
cat /etc/krb5.keytab > /etc/puppetlabs/secrets/myhostname.example.com/etc/krb5.keytab

Then import the following class:

class {'secrets':
  install => {'/etc/krb5.keytab'}
}

or:

class {'secrets':
  install => {'/etc/krb5.keytab' => { group => 'kerberos'}
}

hiera is similar:

secrets::load:
  /etc/krb5.keytab:
    group: kerberos
    notify_services:
      - sshd

Shared secrets

I don't like the idea of letting a host fetch secrets from a non-host specific directory. But for shared secrets (like the HTTPS cert for a load balanced cluser) there needs to be some sort of plan.

My suggestion, is to use symbolic links to a directory containing the shared secrets. This keeps the secrets in one place but also makes clear restrictions on which hosts can access things.

├── hostA.example.com
│   └── example -> ../my_shared_secrets/lbhost.example.com/example
├── hostB.example.com
│   └── example -> ../my_shared_secrets/lbhost.example.com/example
└── my_shared_secrets
    └── lbhost.example.com
        └── example

Usage

Some secrets may not be present on all nodes. For example, ssh added ssh_host_ed25519_key to newer releases. You may elect to make a secret optional by setting mandatory=false. This feature exists so that you can list off every secret you are managing, but only enforce them on applicable nodes.

The most fancy version I can think of looks like:

  class {'secrets':
    install => {'/etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                group => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0400',
                                                mandatory => true,
                                                secret_store   => '/my/private/directory',
                                                notify_services => [ 'sshd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key.pub' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                group => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0444',
                                                mandatory => true,
                                                secret_store   => '/my/private/directory',
                                                notify_services => [ 'sshd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/ssh/ssh_host_ed25519_key' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                group => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0400',
                                                mandatory => false,
                                                secret_store   => '/my/other/directory',
                                                notify_services => [ 'sshd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/ssh/etc/ssh/ssh_host_ed25519_key.pub' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0444',
                                                mandatory => false,
                                                secret_store   => '/my/other/directory',
                                                notify_services => [ 'sshd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/pki/tls/${::domain}.ca' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0444',
                                                mandatory => false,
                                                notify_services => [ 'httpd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/pki/tls/${::fqdn}.crt' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                mode  => '0444',
                                                mandatory => false,
                                                notify_services => [ 'httpd', ],
                                               },
              '/etc/pki/tls/${::hostname}.key' => {
                                                owner => 'root',
                                                group => 'root',
                                                mode  => undef,
                                                mandatory => false,
                                                notify_services => [ 'httpd', ],
                                                posix_acl  => { 'action'     => 'set',
                                                              'permission' => ['group:wheel:r--', ],},
                                               },
    defaults => {'group' => 'wheel' },
  }

In this example we check out two repos and deploy our RSA keys to everyone, and our ED25519 to anyone who has them stored.

If the RSA keys are missing the catalog produces an error, if the ED25519 keys are missing, the report includes a notice that nothing happend.

Any file without the group set directly will default to wheel.

Once done, it will restart the sshd service, though if Service['sshd'] doesn't exist, your catalog will crash.

It will also deploy public/private keys where the filename is determined from the system trusted hostname facts and tell Service['httpd'].

The key used for Service['httpd'] will have a POSIX ACL set to let the wheel group also read the file.

The literal strings ${::domain}, ${::fqdn}, ${::hostname}, ${::networking[domain]}, ${::networking[fqdn]}, ${::networking[hostname]} ${::networking.domain}, ${::networking.fqdn}, ${::networking.hostname} will be converted to the values of $::trusted[domain], $::trusted[hostname], $::trusted[hostname].$::trusted[domain] if they are not converted automatically by your parameter source to an explicit value.

Limitations

This class tries to only act as a secure file deployment method.

The use of the $::trusted facts is by choice to ensure a client cannot swipe someone else's secrets.